jocularWitticism

PEOPLE WHO TAKE THINGS TOO SERIOUSLY MAKE THINGS FUN FOR THE REST OF US

5,464 notes

medievalpoc:

quifrmqueenz:

medievalpoc:

leeandlow submitted to medievalpoc:

The Diversity Gap in the highest grossing science fiction and fantasy films. Sad, right? You can see the full study here.

 I highly recommend reading the entire article. 
from the infographic:
Among the top 100 domestic grossing films:
only 8% of films star a protagonist of color
of the 8 protagonists of color, all are men; 6 are played by Will Smith and 1 is a cartoon character (Aladdin)
0% of protagonists are women of color
0% of protagonists are LGBTQ
1% of protagonists are people with a disability

I never understood why the genre I love so much doesn’t love me back :(

I admit this broke my heart because…me, too.
I have to say that one of the most unexpected and amazing things about Medievalpoc is that I’ve discovered I’m not alone in feeling that way; that there is a whole community out here trying to change that.

medievalpoc:

quifrmqueenz:

medievalpoc:

leeandlow submitted to medievalpoc:

The Diversity Gap in the highest grossing science fiction and fantasy films. Sad, right? You can see the full study here.

I highly recommend reading the entire article.

from the infographic:

Among the top 100 domestic grossing films:

  • only 8% of films star a protagonist of color
  • of the 8 protagonists of color, all are men; 6 are played by Will Smith and 1 is a cartoon character (Aladdin)
  • 0% of protagonists are women of color
  • 0% of protagonists are LGBTQ
  • 1% of protagonists are people with a disability

I never understood why the genre I love so much doesn’t love me back :(

I admit this broke my heart because…me, too.

I have to say that one of the most unexpected and amazing things about Medievalpoc is that I’ve discovered I’m not alone in feeling that way; that there is a whole community out here trying to change that.

(via thepageofhopes)

155 notes

vastderp:

youdidnotseeme:

Dear Anon who had AU delinquent-stuck Callie questions: Yes, she too is a young punk. The entire school for the most part is. Because this is a bad anime cliche AU. She and Cal are the errant wealthy heirs of the vaguely known Doc Scratch and they have enrolled as transfer students in to Condi’s School for Wayward Young Adults. Callie runs the Drawing Club and is trying to gather power so she can REFORM THE SCHOOL AND OVERTHROW THE WITCH with the assistance of her elusive friend ROXY. Too bad the Sewing Club, the Boating Club and the Reading Club (which are full of rancorous seniors) are all in her way. Also her stupid fucking brother is too busy hitting on that weird Makara girl in the Sewing Club to be of any practical help (other than distracting her). 

GIMME ALL THE CALLIOPES

vastderp:

youdidnotseeme:

Dear Anon who had AU delinquent-stuck Callie questions: Yes, she too is a young punk. The entire school for the most part is. Because this is a bad anime cliche AU. She and Cal are the errant wealthy heirs of the vaguely known Doc Scratch and they have enrolled as transfer students in to Condi’s School for Wayward Young Adults. Callie runs the Drawing Club and is trying to gather power so she can REFORM THE SCHOOL AND OVERTHROW THE WITCH with the assistance of her elusive friend ROXY. Too bad the Sewing Club, the Boating Club and the Reading Club (which are full of rancorous seniors) are all in her way. Also her stupid fucking brother is too busy hitting on that weird Makara girl in the Sewing Club to be of any practical help (other than distracting her). 

GIMME ALL THE CALLIOPES

7,692 notes

drovie:

artofcarmen:

A while ago I heard a version of this story where Athena has pity on Medusa and turns her into the gorgon to protect her from all men. A gift instead of a punishment for her brother’s crimes.
It always stuck with me, so here’s a doodle.

This has come up on my blog a few times, and I REALLY really am struck by how beautiful this is. so.. reblogging it to you guys. Isn’t it lovely?

drovie:

artofcarmen:

A while ago I heard a version of this story where Athena has pity on Medusa and turns her into the gorgon to protect her from all men. A gift instead of a punishment for her brother’s crimes.

It always stuck with me, so here’s a doodle.

This has come up on my blog a few times, and I REALLY really am struck by how beautiful this is. so.. reblogging it to you guys. Isn’t it lovely?

(via ashkatom)

57 notes

Anonymous asked: this is probably going to sound awful, but i hate being told that i shouldn't kill myself for the sake of my family. i'm mostly likely not anyway, but whenever i get the urge it's because i just cannot see a future that isn't horrible in some way. and i know i have people who love me and would miss me and be very upset but it's not their future that would be grey and miserable. why do i have to stay alive to be unemployed and hate myself just for their sake?

the-real-seebs:

That is a fair question. I don’t think it sounds awful at all.

First off, part of this is the tradeoff; their future might not be grey and miserable if you lived, but might be if you didn’t. Now, you might not be super inclined to be self-sacrificing in such a case, but it’s usually a very persuasive argument, even though it isn’t really the best argument. To understand why, we have to talk a bit more generally about depression.

In general, the evidence is that suicidal people are objectively mistaken about their future. Which is to say: Among people who have tried to commit suicide, and are still alive a few years later, generally reported happiness is pretty high. Maybe not quite as high as the worldwide average, but they are consistently happy to be alive and glad they did not die. (“Consistently” doesn’t mean “absolutely 100%, no exceptions”, but it’s well over 70%, and I think over 90%. Someone who has stats handy could look it up.) So we generally conclude that suicidal ideations are not a result of a clear and accurate view of the future, but of something else.

Suicide is strongly associated with depression. And depression isn’t necessarily bad for your accuracy-of-thought, in general, but there is one very noticeable and characteristic failure mode: Your evaluation of benefits or rewards, particularly for yourself, becomes horribly inaccurate. This is why one of the most heavily-recommended things for depressed people is to try to help someone else. When you do things that benefit yourself, normally you feel like you’ve accomplished something. When you’re depressed, that short-circuits and doesn’t work. But! When you do things that benefit other people, depression is much less likely to intercept that and make you not feel it. So even though normally things that benefit you feel at least as good as things that benefit other people (by similar amounts), when you’re depressed, that’s not true.

Which means that if you tell depressed people that, no, really, the evidence is extremely strong that if they live five more years they will feel happier then than they believe is possible now, this will not seem persuasive even if they believe you. Because their evaluation of how nice it would be to be happy and carefree and alive comes back as “that doesn’t sound much better”, even though obviously it ought to be much better. But if you tell them that other people will be happier if they live than if they die, the evaluation-of-worth works properly.

So, just in terms of your own self-interest: You should stay alive because your chances of actually being happier and not hating yourself are actually really good, even though they don’t look that way. But since often it’s hard for people to believe that, people often provide advice focusing on a thing which is easier for depressed people to believe and assign value or worth to. That’s because your brain is lying to you about what you’re worth, and since we can’t just handwave that away (or we wouldn’t have to have the conversation at all), we have to present an argument in terms of claims your brain is less likely to lie to you about.

From a societal standpoint, of course, people might well care more about the many people who would be hurt by your death than they do about you personally, because there’s more of them than there are of you. And you would be totally within your rights to say “yeah, well, it’s not them living through this” to that. But conveniently, it really does turn out that you’re likely to end up happier too.

57 notes

Anonymous asked: this is probably going to sound awful, but i hate being told that i shouldn't kill myself for the sake of my family. i'm mostly likely not anyway, but whenever i get the urge it's because i just cannot see a future that isn't horrible in some way. and i know i have people who love me and would miss me and be very upset but it's not their future that would be grey and miserable. why do i have to stay alive to be unemployed and hate myself just for their sake?

the-real-seebs:

That is a fair question. I don’t think it sounds awful at all.

First off, part of this is the tradeoff; their future might not be grey and miserable if you lived, but might be if you didn’t. Now, you might not be super inclined to be self-sacrificing in such a case, but it’s usually a very persuasive argument, even though it isn’t really the best argument. To understand why, we have to talk a bit more generally about depression.

In general, the evidence is that suicidal people are objectively mistaken about their future. Which is to say: Among people who have tried to commit suicide, and are still alive a few years later, generally reported happiness is pretty high. Maybe not quite as high as the worldwide average, but they are consistently happy to be alive and glad they did not die. (“Consistently” doesn’t mean “absolutely 100%, no exceptions”, but it’s well over 70%, and I think over 90%. Someone who has stats handy could look it up.) So we generally conclude that suicidal ideations are not a result of a clear and accurate view of the future, but of something else.

Suicide is strongly associated with depression. And depression isn’t necessarily bad for your accuracy-of-thought, in general, but there is one very noticeable and characteristic failure mode: Your evaluation of benefits or rewards, particularly for yourself, becomes horribly inaccurate. This is why one of the most heavily-recommended things for depressed people is to try to help someone else. When you do things that benefit yourself, normally you feel like you’ve accomplished something. When you’re depressed, that short-circuits and doesn’t work. But! When you do things that benefit other people, depression is much less likely to intercept that and make you not feel it. So even though normally things that benefit you feel at least as good as things that benefit other people (by similar amounts), when you’re depressed, that’s not true.

Which means that if you tell depressed people that, no, really, the evidence is extremely strong that if they live five more years they will feel happier then than they believe is possible now, this will not seem persuasive even if they believe you. Because their evaluation of how nice it would be to be happy and carefree and alive comes back as “that doesn’t sound much better”, even though obviously it ought to be much better. But if you tell them that other people will be happier if they live than if they die, the evaluation-of-worth works properly.

So, just in terms of your own self-interest: You should stay alive because your chances of actually being happier and not hating yourself are actually really good, even though they don’t look that way. But since often it’s hard for people to believe that, people often provide advice focusing on a thing which is easier for depressed people to believe and assign value or worth to. That’s because your brain is lying to you about what you’re worth, and since we can’t just handwave that away (or we wouldn’t have to have the conversation at all), we have to present an argument in terms of claims your brain is less likely to lie to you about.

From a societal standpoint, of course, people might well care more about the many people who would be hurt by your death than they do about you personally, because there’s more of them than there are of you. And you would be totally within your rights to say “yeah, well, it’s not them living through this” to that. But conveniently, it really does turn out that you’re likely to end up happier too.

44,715 notes

Most girls are relentlessly told that we will be treated how we demand to be treated. If we want respect, we must respect ourselves.

This does three things. Firstly, it gets men off the hook for being held accountable for how they treat women. And secondly, it makes women feel that the mistreatment and sometimes outright violence they face due to their gender is primarily their fault. And thirdly, it positions women to be unable to speak out against sexism because we are made to believe any sexism we experience would not have happened if we had done something differently.

I cannot demand a man to respect me. No more than I can demand that anybody do anything. I can ask men to be nice to me. But chances are if I even have to ask he does not care to be nice. I can express displeasure when I’m not being respected. But that doesn’t solve the issue that I was disrespected in the first place.

I can choose to not deal with a man once he proves to be disrespectful and/or sexist. But even that does not solve the initial problem of the fact that I had to experience being disrespected in the first place.

As a young girl, I wish that instead of being told that I needed to demand respect from men that I had been told that when I am not respected by men that it’s his fault and not mine. But that would require that we quit having numerous arbitrary standards for what it means to be a “respectable” woman. It would mean that I am not judged as deserving violence based on how I speak, what I wear, what I do, and who I am.

excerpt from “FYI, I Cannot “Demand” Respect From Men so Stop Telling Me That!" @ One Black Girl. Many Words. (via androphilia)

(Source: daniellemertina, via summer-of-supervillainy)

Filed under Quote

119,747 notes

fandomsandfeminism:

moonblossom:

chenisthebestkitty:

geekdonnatroy:

castayel:

fuchsimeon:

viperpilot:

Well, this is embarrassing

Left: Adrianne Palicki promo shot for NBC’s Wonder Woman.

Right: Kimberly Kane promo shot for ‘Wonder Woman XXX: An Axel Braun Parody’.

….is it just me or does the porno version outfit not only look WAY BETTER crafted and prettier, the actress also has more muscles, a nicer fitting chest piece and a waaay more fitting body type and skin tone. 

Also the porno version doesn’t look more “feminine”/more sexy whatever.

That… is EMBARASSING

the “official” one looks like a really bad Halloween costume

I mean fuck the porno one has bigger wrist cuff I REPEATE: BIGGER WRIST CUFFS PORNO WOMAN IS BETTER DRESSED TO KICK ASS *cries*

can someone contact the designer of the porno 

clearly he/she knows how a womans body works.

It’s embarrassing when the official looks a like a porn and the porn looks like the official thing.

The thing that makes me stunned the most is that even the boobs of the porn version are cupped and held in better by her clothing than those of the official thing…

The moment a porn movie treats the boobs of a woman with more subtlety than a big name production, some staff changes are in order.

What both fascinates and disturbs me the most about these is the body language and facial expression.

The “official” TV version looks passive, slightly confused, her pose is sort of ambiguous and floppy. She’s waiting for the viewer to do something before she reacts. The XXX version looks determined and fierce, and is taking literally 0% of your shit.

One of these Wonder Women looks like a sex toy, and it’s not the pornographic one.

I’m laughing hysterically.
How bad can your costume department fuck up when a PORN PARODY has better looking costumes? Fuckin’ A.

(via bramblepatch)